Fruit Trees Will Bless Generations of Children

10/22/13

It was raining in Uganda, but that didn’t dampen the girls’ plans. As soon as class was dismissed, they ran out to a patch of land where a Venture Team from Southern California was working hard.

 
The girls only had a few minutes before their next class, but they wanted to help. So they did the one thing they could think of—they sang to the team. Their beautiful songs cheered on the team and reminded them why they had traveled so far to plant fruit trees for the children in Uganda. “This is an investment in future generations,” says Meghan Bonine, the team’s leader. 
 
The children are looking forward to the time when they can eat the trees' fruit
                    The children are looking forward to the time when they can eat fruit from their new trees!
 
It took the team several days to plant all fifty trees. They don’t look like much now—they are barely tall enough to keep their leaves from sweeping the ground—but they have a big future. Their fruit will feed generations of children in Uganda. These trees are another powerful way partners like you are helping to care for the children by developing sustainable food sources.
 
These hand-woven fences will protect the growing trees from animals
               These hand-woven fences will protect the growing trees from being eaten or trampled by animals.
 
“The children are definitely excited about these trees,” says Sylvia Taussig, Children of the Nations’ Uganda liaison. They already enjoy bananas and papayas from a few of the older trees on the property. In just a few years they will also get to eat avocados, pawpaws, mangoes, and jackfruit, thanks to this team and others that have planted trees this year. “A huge part of raising children is feeding them so they have proper development,” says Sylvia. “Being able to provide a varied diet for nutrition is huge.” 
 
The team worked hard to finish the tree project despite the rain
The team worked hard to finish the tree project despite the rain. “Hopefully the kids will keep in mind, when they see the trees, that there were people who cared about them,” says team member Allie Biedermann.
 
But these trees are doing more than just feeding the children. As they help care for the trees, the children are learning invaluable lessons in responsibility and agriculture. In Uganda, about eighty percent of the population grows food for survival or income. “It’s just a basic, good, life skill even if they don’t want to be farmers,” says Peter Drennan, COTN’s sustainable development director. 
 
Planting the fifty fruit trees was hard work, but the team had fun doing it
                                    Planting the fifty fruit trees was hard work, but the team had fun doing it.
 
The team hopes their work will provide for more than just the children’s physical care. “These trees are growing up as the children are growing up,” says team member Allie Biedermann, “Hopefully they will keep in mind, when they see the trees, that there were people who cared about them.”
 
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