How Soap Put a Smile on a Child's Face

10/07/20
 

When Sarah * got a rash on her skin, there was nothing she could do to get rid of it. She had gotten the rash from the soap she used to bathe and to launder her clothes. 

 
This soap, a locally-made soap called “Africana”, was the only one available to her. If she wanted to keep her clothes and herself clean, she would have to use it. Rashes like this are often red, itchy, and uncomfortable, and can sometimes cause hives, swelling, and even blisters. 
 
 
Sarah is 15-years-old and lives with her mother, father, four brothers, and sister. In many ways, she is a normal teenage girl. She loves hanging out with her friends and she is very friendly. She is a hard-working and determined student. She is a chorister at the church in Senehun, Sierra Leone and helps arrange the church before and after worship.
 
Sarah is a part of Children of the Nations Village Partnership Program in Senehun. Sarah’s parents are subsistent farmers, which means they only grow what they can eat for a season. It is often difficult for them to meet the needs of all six of their children. 
 
After getting this rash, Sarah decided to come to the Children of the Nation’s Resource Office and asked for a Hygiene SmilePack. These packs provide hygiene essentials to children who need them. They include: three bars of soap, a bottle of shampoo, a toothbrush, toothpaste, bandages, and more. 
 
When Sarah received her SmilePack, she no longer had to use the soap that gave her a rash!
 
“My mouth is speechless, I don’t know how to thank donors for this gift. God will bless you! Amen!” said Sarah. 
                           
 
Hygiene is so important to a child’s physical health and is even more vital during the pandemic. Our goal is to give 5,000 SmilePacks to children just like Sarah in Africa and the Caribbean, but we can’t do it without you! 
 
You can learn how to assemble Hygiene SmilePacks here or donate one here. Every $15 will provide a child in need with their own Hygiene SmilePack.
 

 

* This child’s name and photo has been changed for their privacy