A Glimpse into Mada’s Day and Life

01/17/08

At five o’clock in the morning, when most people in the small African country of Malawi are sleeping, Madalitso Msipho wakes up to start her day. She is in her mid-twenties, yet she has nine girls to take care of. These are not her biological children; they are girls who have been taken into the COTN girls’ home in Malawi and placed under the care of “Aunt Mada” as the children fondly call her. When she wakes up, Aunt Mada takes the children to the nearby church where they have their morning intercession prayers until 5:30 a.m. When Mada and her girls are back in their home after the prayers, Mada announces to them what the day will be like and then leads the children in their morning chores, which includes sweeping and mopping the home. While the children are cleaning the house, the ever-smiling Mada prepares breakfast for the house. After breakfast the children head off to go to school leaving their aunt at home. The rest of Mada’s day is spent preparing lunch for when the children come back from school, helping the women at the feeding center, tutoring her girls with their studies, overseeing indoor games, and preparing their supper.

Madalitso is one of the COTN staff members in Malawi who are directly involved with the children. She joined the family of COTN six years ago. She says, “I am happy to be in this family of COTN. We are one big family and everything that every officer does ends in helping the children.”

When asked if COTN is empowering her at all, she said, “COTN has entrusted me with these children. I do everything for them that a parent would do. I assess their needs and write budgets every month. I am the one who communicates with the office on every matter concerning these children. They look at me as their mother and a person they can rely on. This has made me grow, become responsible and organized.

Mada says her work does not only end with the children at Mtsiliza girls home. She says;
“Our work translates into the whole community. With the girls in the home we formed a babies ministry where we help newly born babies with gifts, cheering their mothers and anything we can do.” Mada and the girls also cheer the sick in their community and teach the word of God to other children who attend the feeding program.

Aunt Madalitso says what excites her most is the fact that she has seen these girls receive Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior, and she has also seen them grow spiritually, socially, and physically.