Parents Learn to Read, to Help their Children Succeed

10/10/13

Yaquelin hid her face in embarrassment. She had to sign a form for her children at the clinic, but she was afraid she'd give away her secret by doing so. 

 
She nervously glanced from side to side to see if anyone was looking, then quickly scribbled three x's. That was the only way she knew how to sign her name. 
 
Yaquelin wished she had learned to write, but she knew it was too late. She had been forced to drop out of school when she was nine years old, because her family needed her to work. She had only made it to third grade, and never learned to read or write. 
 
Yaquelin had to drop out of school to work when she was nine
Yaquelin had to drop out of school to work when she was nine years old. When she became a mother, she was sad that she couldn't help her children with their schoolwork.
 
Several years later, when she had the opportunity to go to school, Yaquelin decided to stay home. She was too embarrassed of her age. With nothing to do, and no one to support her, she married and began having children. "My husband had to read and write for me," she says. "It was very stressful to always have to depend on him." 
 
Today, Yaquelin is grateful that her children will not have the same fate a she did. Thanks to generous people like you, all of her children are attending the Children of the Nations school in their community of Pueblo Nuevo in the Dominican Republic. All of them have learned to read and write, and they are dreaming of becoming doctors, engineers, and teachers. 
 
Yaquelin's children are now attending school thanks to people like you
                                      Yaquelin's children are now attending school thanks to people like you. 
 
But Yaquelin still felt like she couldn't give her children what they needed. "My children used to ask me for help with their homework, and I couldn't help them," she says. "They knew more than me." 
 
One day, Yaquelin heard a knock on her door. It was a staff member from Children of the Nations, inviting her to attend an adult literacy class. Her first instinct was to say no. But the staff member told her it was never too late to learn. So she signed up. 
 
Last week, Yaquelin graduated from her class. "It is very exciting now that I can sign my name without an 'x'!" she says. "I can sign, read, and write by myself." 
 
Yaquelin (in yellow pants) proudly marches to her graduation ceremony
                                      Yaquelin (in yellow pants) proudly marches to her graduation ceremony. 
 
When you care for children through child sponsorship, you are not just providing for their education, food, and spiritual care. Your support helps fund programs like the adult literacy class, so that parents like Yaquelin can be supportive and involved in their children's education. 
 
Yaquelin's friend Yorkiri writes her name
Yaquelin's friend Yorkiri writes her name. "I have realized it is never too late to be educated," says Yorkiri. 
 
"Now my children ask me for help and I can do it," says Yaquelin with a proud smile. Thank you for helping her be the best mother she can be! 
 
A graduate of the adult literacy class with Francisco Tejeda
A graduate of the adult literacy class receives his certificate from COTN–Dominican Republic Country Director Francisco Tejeda. 
 
Help change whole families! Sponsor a child today!